All Things Considered for January 2, 2011 Hear the All Things Considered program for January 2, 2011

All Things Considered

A drill seargent watches the basic-training graduation ceremony at Fort Jackson, S.C. The Pentagon and former military leaders are worried about a new report that shows many high school graduates can't pass the military's entrance exam. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Military Recruiting: Are We Passing The Test?

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This is what researchers at the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider expect data from a Higgs boson to look like. The Higgs boson is the subatomic particle that scientists say gives everything in the universe mass. ATLAS Experiment/CERN hide caption

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ATLAS Experiment/CERN

Particle Pings: Sounds Of The Large Hadron Collider

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Today's human brain is about 10 percent smaller than the Cro-Magnon brain from more than 20,000 years ago. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Our Brains Are Shrinking. Are We Getting Dumber?

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Roasted pigs are displayed at a store in Manila, Philippines. Pork is considered lucky for the new year in Germany and other countries. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

How To Eat For A Lucky New Year

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Steve Duncan, an urban explorer who has examined the hidden infrastructure of major cities all over the world, emerges from a manhole in New York City. Courtesy of Steve Duncan hide caption

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Courtesy of Steve Duncan

Into The Tunnels: Exploring The Underside Of NYC

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All Things Considered