All Things Considered for July 21, 2011 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 21, 2011

All Things Considered

The size of the Marine Corps could be reduced with the withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan and Iraq, as the Pentagon focuses its resources on other types of threats, like cyberattacks. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

No Longer 'Wine And Roses' For Defense Spending

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Demonstrators hold up a sign during a rally in front of the State Building in San Francisco on July 1 to support prisoners at Pelican Bay State Prison. Inmates in an isolation unit at the prison went on a hunger strike to protest conditions they describe as inhumane. The hunger strike later spread to other facilities. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Hunger Strike Puts Focus On Calif. Prison Conditions

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President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act into law. One provision of the law is still controversial. AP hide caption

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AP

Redistricting Cases Challenge The Voting Rights Act

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Claude Jarman, Jr., at age 11, holding a fawn on the set of The Yearling in 1946. Martha Holmes/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image hide caption

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Martha Holmes/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

On Location: The Central Florida Of 'The Yearling'

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President Obama signs the financial reform bill into law, July 21, 2010. Vice President Joe Biden, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), then Senate Banking Chairman Christopher Dodd (D-CT), House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank (D-MA) and other lawmakers look on. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

One Year Later, Financial Reform Questions Remain

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A Tribe Called Quest in the early days. From left to right, Jarobi White, Q-Tip, Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Phife Dawg. Ernie Paniccioli/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Ernie Paniccioli/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

A Tribe Called Quest: The Rise And Fall Of A Legend

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