All Things Considered for August 23, 2011 Hear the All Things Considered program for August 23, 2011

All Things Considered

In June, marchers protested Alabama's new law cracking down on illegal immigration. The state's United Methodist, Episcopal and Roman Catholic churches have sued, arguing the law that's set to take effect Sept. 1 violates their religious freedom. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

Clergy Sues To Stop Alabama's Immigration Law

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Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson on stage in New York around 1978. Richard E. Aaron/Redferns hide caption

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Richard E. Aaron/Redferns

Nick Ashford, Songwriter, Singer And Producer, Has Died

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Passengers wait in line at the United Airlines terminal at Chicago's O'Hare airport in 2009 after a computer malfunction caused long delays and the cancellation of some United flights. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

New Rules Aim For More Passenger-Friendly Skies

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Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir speaks of the capital Khartoum on July 12. Sudan says it should be taken off the U.S. terrorism list, but Washington says it is concerned about new fighting in the south of the country. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

A New Obstacle To Normal Relations For Sudan, U.S.

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Laemouahuma Daniel Jatta plays the akonting, an African instrument that may be a precursor to the banjo. Courtesy of Chuck Levy hide caption

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Courtesy of Chuck Levy

The Banjo's Roots, Reconsidered

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