All Things Considered for September 1, 2011 Hear the All Things Considered program for September 1, 2011

All Things Considered

U.S. Park Police officers arrest demonstrators in front of the While House on Thursday. They were protesting against a proposed 1,700-mile-long pipeline that would carry oil from the tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to the U.S. Gulf Coast. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

For Protesters, Keystone Pipeline Is Line In Tar Sand

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House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) told members of his party that the jobs crisis would be at the top of their agenda this fall. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

In Jobs Debate, GOP Targets 'Regulatory Burdens'

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A screen grab of Syrian Attorney General Anan Bakkor, during a video he made where he resigned from his post and revealed that he was forced to cover up deaths related to the popular uprising in the country. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Syrian Official Quits, Cites Regime's Brutality

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Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, shown speaking at an American Legion Post in Nashua, N.H., last month, is campaigning again in the state this week. The Republican White House hopeful so far hasn't run any TV ads in the state. Cheryl Senter/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Senter/AP

Can Jon Huntsman Break Away From The Pack?

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Beres Hammond onstage at Reggae Sunsplash in August of 1993. On Reggae Goes Country he sings "He Stopped Loving Her Today," most famously recorded by George Jones. David Corio/Redferns hide caption

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David Corio/Redferns

Reggae Loves Country: A 50-Year Romance

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Matthew VanDyke walks toward his former cell as he takes journalists on a tour of the Abu Salim prison in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, on Tuesday. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images

Americans Emerge After Months In Gadhafi's Prisons

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A lab technician prepares blood samples from volunteers for viral genotyping at a government-run health center in Bagamoyo, Tanzania, in 2009. Tanzania is currently hosting the final stages of a human trial of a pioneering vaccine against malaria. The vaccine is one of many medical innovations to emerge from Walter Reed over the decades. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

Military Medicine's Long War Against Malaria

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Cmdr. Andrew Smith with the Los Angeles Police Department helps enforce a city ordinance that cracks down on illegal animal sales. Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard for NPR

LAPD Officer Puts A Muzzle On Illegal Animal Sales

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The brain "seems to be specialized in alerting us to things that are emotionally important to us — either positive or because they're scary," a scientist says. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Human Brain Responds To Animals, Cute Or Creepy

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