All Things Considered for March 23, 2012 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 23, 2012

All Things Considered

Former Solicitor General Paul D. Clement speaks during a forum at the Georgetown University Law Center on March 9. Clement will be arguing against President Obama's health care act in the Supreme Court next week. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP hide caption

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Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP

The Legal Wunderkind Challenging The Health Law

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Homes sit along Retreat View Circle in Sanford, Fla., near where Trayvon Martin was shot by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. Roberto Gonzalez /Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Gonzalez /Getty Images

Shooter Silent As Slain Teen's Family Cries For Justice

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Connie Marrero, age 100, was a major league all-star who struck out the likes of Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle. He returned to his native Cuba after his career ended. He's now the oldest living ex-major leaguer and is finally getting a pension payment. He's shown here at his apartment in Havana. Nick Miroff/NPR hide caption

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Nick Miroff/NPR

At 100, Cuban All-Star To Get A Pension At Last

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In this 2005 photo, then-Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney presents Afghan President Hamid Karzai with a memento at Boston's Logan Airport. Karzai was preparing to speak at Boston University's commencement. Dina Rudick /AP hide caption

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Dina Rudick /AP

How Would A President Romney Handle Afghanistan?

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Protesters rally for religious freedom in front of Philadelphia's Independence Hall on Friday. Rallies took place nationwide to protest the mandate that some religious organizations cover the cost of contraception. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Thousands Rally For Religious Freedom Nationwide

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David Unkovic makes his case. Christine Baker/The Patriot-News hide caption

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Christine Baker/The Patriot-News

Trying To Save A Broke City

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Dr. Jim Yong Kim is introduced as the new president of Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., in 2009. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole/AP

Global Health Expert Chosen As World Bank Nominee

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Joyce Wong, a pregnant 30-year-old, takes part in a January 15 protest against immigration laws that allow babies born in Hong Kong to mainland Chinese mothers to be eligible for residency, education and medical care in the territory. Hong Kong residents fear the influx of mainlanders will further burden overtaxed resources. Joyce Woo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joyce Woo/AFP/Getty Images

For Hong Kong And Mainland, Distrust Only Grows

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Niecy Nash is the star of the new family "docu-sitcom," Leave It To Niecy, on TLC. Robert Ector/TLC hide caption

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Robert Ector/TLC

Niecy Nash Puts Her Blended Family In The Reality Spotlight

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