All Things Considered for March 28, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 28, 2013

All Things Considered

A rescued manatee suffering from exposure to an algae bloom called red tide in southwest Florida comes up for air as it swims into a critical care tank at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo. Steve Nesius/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Steve Nesius/Reuters/Landov

Algae Bloom Kills Record Number Of Florida Manatees

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A police car is posted outside the Women's Medical Society in Philadelphia, on Jan. 20, 2011. Dr. Kermit Gosnell, accused of murder, performed abortions in the clinic. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Pennsylvania Tightens Abortion Rules Following Clinic Deaths

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Tuscany's sweet spinach pie is a dish that's often associated with Easter and spring. Courtesy of Pinella Orgiana hide caption

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Courtesy of Pinella Orgiana

Tuscan Pie A Sweet Springtime Take On Spinach

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Thousands of "fairy circles" dot the landscape of the NamibRand Nature Reserve in Namibia. Why these barren circles appear in grassland areas has puzzled scientists for years. N. Juergens/AAAS/Science hide caption

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N. Juergens/AAAS/Science

What's Behind The 'Fairy Circles' That Dot West Africa?

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Chief Almir of Brazil's Surui tribe attends a press conference with Google representatives in Rio de Janeiro last year. Chief Almir has brought technology to his previously isolated people, who now use smartphones to send photos of illegal logging in the Amazon. Vanderlei Almeida /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida /AFP/Getty Images

From The Stone Age To The Digital Age In One Big Leap

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All Things Considered