All Things Considered for April 15, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for April 15, 2013

All Things Considered

Korean American rap artist, Dumbfoundead performs at the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C., on March 26. Lauren Rock for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Rock for NPR

Dumbfoundead: A Rising Star In A Genre In Transition

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Dallas exonerees Christopher Scott (center) and Richard Miles, accompanied by Scott's girlfriend, Kelly Gindratt, prepare to be honored in the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, in March. Courtesy of Jamie Meltzer/Freedom Fighters Documentary hide caption

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Courtesy of Jamie Meltzer/Freedom Fighters Documentary

Exoneree Detectives Fight For Those Still Behind Bars

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The paying and collecting of taxes might not be the sexiest plot point in an industry that depends on sizzle. But that doesn't mean revenuers haven't made their mark on screen. Airyelf/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Airyelf/iStockphoto.com

On The Big Screen, The Tax Guy Can Be Your Buddy

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Medical geneticist Dr. Harry Ostrer (center) talks to the press outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. The court heard oral arguments on the highly charged question of whether human genes can be patented. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Justices Appear Skeptical Of Patenting Human Genes

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Drinks columnist David Wondrich is seen on Esquire's new Talk to Esquire app, which allows users to interact with several of the magazine's columnists through voice recognition. Screengrab via YouTube hide caption

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Screengrab via YouTube

Speak Up! Advertisers Want You To Talk With New Apps

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All Things Considered