All Things Considered for May 23, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 23, 2013

All Things Considered

Author Jarrett Krosoczka teaches a drawing class to a group of third- and fifth-graders at the Walker-Jones Education Campus in Washington, D.C. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

'Lunch Lady' Author Helps Students Draw Their Own Heroes

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Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., has introduced a federal bill to ban most abortions after 20 weeks' gestation — six weeks into the second trimester. This is the second straight Congress he's done so, but this time he's broadened his bill to encompass all 50 states, not just D.C. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Abortion Opponents Try to Spin Murder Case Into Legislation

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Texas Gov. Rick Perry addresses the opening session of the Texas Legislature in Austin earlier this year. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Health Officials Decry Texas' Snubbing Of Medicaid Billions

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At Michigan State University's Clarksville Research Station, researchers apply pollen by hand to tart cherry blossoms, in order to breed new varieties. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Inside A Tart Cherry Revival: 'Somebody Needs To Do This!'

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Georges Moustaki with Edith Piaf in New York in 1958. Moustaki wrote the lyrics to "Milord," one of Piaf's biggest hits. Keystone-France/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone-France/Getty Images

Georges Moustaki, Who Wrote Songs For Edith Piaf, Dies

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Students and teachers from Eastlake Elementary and Plaza Towers Elementary schools gathered Thursday to say goodbye for the summer. This was a chance to reconnect after the devastating tornado brought an abrupt end to the school year at Plaza Towers in Moore, Okla. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

After The Storm: Students Gather For One More School Day

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Lionel Alverez stands at a family tomb in Plaquemines Parish, La. Hurricane Isaac's storm surge split the double-decker tomb in half, leaving his aunt's and sister's caskets on the bottom but washing away his mother's, which was on top. Keith O'Brien for NPR hide caption

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Keith O'Brien for NPR

In La., Families Still Searching For Storm-Scattered Remains

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Hurricane Sandy churns off the Atlantic coast on Oct. 29. NOAA officials are forecasting seven to 11 hurricanes, compared with about six in a typical season. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

'Extremely Active' Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted

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James Cameron traveled to the bottom of the Mariana Trench last year — a depth of nearly seven miles. Courtesy of Mark Thiessen/National Geographic hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Thiessen/National Geographic

Descending Into The Mariana Trench: James Cameron's Odyssey

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