All Things Considered for July 9, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 9, 2013

All Things Considered

A member of Egypt's police special forces stands guard next to an armored vehicle on July 3, protecting a bridge between Cairo's Tahrir Square and Cairo University where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

For Now At Least, Egypt's Police Are Seen As The Good Guys

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Esteban Roncancio and other protesters call for executive action on workplace discrimination for LGBT Americans in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Gays And Lesbians Turn Fight To Workplace Discrimination Ban

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Nurse Marina Bogdanova, with Sputnik, gives medications to Sergei Gaptenko, who is close to finishing treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Konstantin Salomatin for NPR hide caption

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Konstantin Salomatin for NPR

'Sputnik' Orbits A Russian City, Finding And Healing Tuberculosis

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People walk on the Columbia University campus in New York City on July 1, the day the federal student loan interest rate hike kicked in. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Congress Still Squabbling Over Student Loan Rate Increase

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Much of the training for pilots for major airlines is conducted on sophisticated flight simulators, like this Boeing 787 simulator operated by an All Nippon Airways captain. Pilots are also trained to communicate clearly about problems they may encounter in flight. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

After Asiana Crash, Pilot Training Gets New Scrutiny

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