All Things Considered for October 24, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 24, 2013

All Things Considered

The protein, unsaturated fat composition and fiber in almonds all very likely play a role in helping to curb appetites. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Almonds For Skinny Snackers? Yes, They Help Curb Your Appetite

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The FBI and Department of Justice are working to encourage local law enforcement agencies to view child prostitutes as potential human trafficking victims rather than criminals. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Feds Recast Child Prostitutes As Victims, Not Criminals

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A woman drives a car in Saudi Arabia on Sunday. Saudi Arabia is the only country where women are barred from driving, but activists have launched a renewed protest and are urging women to drive on Saturday. Faisal Al Nasser/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Faisal Al Nasser/Reuters/Landov

Saudi Women Go For A Spin In Latest Challenge To Driving Ban

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Blue Is the Warmest Color focuses on the relationship that develops between Adele (Adele Exarchopoulos, left) and Emma (Lea Seydoux), and it includes two explicit sex scene that have raised hackles among some critics. IFC Films/Sundance Selects/Wild Bunch hide caption

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IFC Films/Sundance Selects/Wild Bunch

For 'Blue,' The Palme d'Or Was Only The Beginning

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Jennifer Haselberger, former top canon lawyer for the archdiocese, found stored files detailing how some priests had histories of sexual abuse. She resigned in April. Jennifer Simonson/Minnesota Public Radio hide caption

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Jennifer Simonson/Minnesota Public Radio

Abuse Allegations Leave Twin Cities Archdiocese In Turmoil

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An Afghan child writes on a blackboard at a school built by German troops in a refugee camp on the outskirts of Mazar-e-Sharif. The number of students enrolled in Afghan schools has skyrocketed since the fall of the Taliban at the end of 2001. Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images

Are Afghanistan's Schools Doing As Well As Touted?

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Doc Pomus, pictured here in the 1980s, was an obscure, yet prolific songwriter who died in 1991. A.K.A. Doc Pomus is a documentary about his life. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Life Of Doc Pomus, Songwriter To The Stars

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Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

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