All Things Considered for October 30, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 30, 2013

All Things Considered

One person who got a letter canceling his health insurance was Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Colo. He holds up the letter during a congressional hearing Wednesday on insurance problems. He says his family chose to buy private insurance rather than use the congressional plan. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Notices Canceling Health Insurance Leave Many On Edge

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Jon Stewart, shown here interviewing President Obama on The Daily Show in October 2012, has been lampooning the problems with the Affordable Care Act website in recent episodes. Brad Barket/PictureGroup hide caption

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Brad Barket/PictureGroup

Medicinal Laughs: Could 'Daily Show' Sour Millennials On ACA?

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Hundreds of protesters march toward the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office in response to the death of Andy Lopez in Santa Rosa. Noah Berger/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Noah Berger/Reuters/Landov

Police, Community Relations Strained After Teen's Death

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Marta Rangel Medel vacuums the stage in preparation for the Texas Democratic Party 2012 election watch party in Austin. The state's controversial voter ID law is unexpectedly hindering women at the polls. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Texas' Voter ID Law Creates A Problem For Some Women

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A Norfolk Southern train pulls oil tank units on its way to the PBF Energy refinery in Delaware City, Del. As U.S. oil production outpaces its pipeline capacity, more and more companies are looking to the railways to transport crude oil. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

Trains Gain Steam In Race To Transport Crude Oil In The U.S.

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The Rockaway section of Queens, in New York City, was hit hard by Superstorm Sandy. Many people in the neighborhood, shown here on October 30, 2012, lost power. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In Sandy's Wake, Flood Zones And Insurance Rates Re-Examined

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A Marmaray Project train awaits its inauguration ceremony in Istanbul on Tuesday. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Ottoman Dream Come True: Train Links East And West In Istanbul

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