All Things Considered for November 6, 2013 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 6, 2013

All Things Considered

In Washington state, dogs don't need to sniff out pot anymore, but troopers are keeping an eye out for high drivers. Matthew Staver/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Staver/Bloomberg via Getty Images

There May Be A Green Light For Pot, But Not For Driving High

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Guadalupe Chavez moved to a trailer home in Oregon after her sexual assault case went to trial in California. Grace Rubenstein/Center for Investigative Reporting hide caption

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Grace Rubenstein/Center for Investigative Reporting

Despite Barriers, Farm Worker Breaks Silence About Rape Case

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People wait in line at a counter for medical services at the Guanganmen Chinese medicine hospital in Beijing. David Gray/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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David Gray/Reuters /Landov

In Violent Hospitals, China's Doctors Can Become Patients

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At Lansing Community College in Michigan, students who've moved on to four-year schools can come back and claim their credits, and maybe even a degree. David Shane/Flickr hide caption

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David Shane/Flickr

Michigan Works To Match Dropouts With Degrees Already Earned

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday heard oral arguments in a case exploring prayer at government functions. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Examines Anew Prayer At Government Functions

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A player from the Vatican's new cricket team of priests and seminarians returns a ball during a training session at the Mater Ecclesiae Catholic college in Rome last month. The Vatican officially declared its intention to defeat the Church of England — not in a theological re-match nearly 500 years after they split, but on the cricket pitch. Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters /Landov

The Vatican Reaches Out, A Cricket Match At A Time

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