All Things Considered for January 17th, 2014 Hear the All Things Considered program for January 17th, 2014

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President Barack Obama talks about National Security Agency surveillance Jan. 17 at the Justice Department in Washington. Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Politics

5 Takeaways From The President's NSA Speech

The president's speech Friday offered a revealing look into the nation's phone data collection program and the direction of the surveillance policy debate. But some of biggest controversies have been put off or pushed to Congress.

President Barack Obama talks about National Security Agency surveillance Jan. 17 at the Justice Department in Washington. Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

5 Takeaways From The President's NSA Speech

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Gwendolyn Elizabeth Boyd, Alabama State University's first female president. Debbie Elliot/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliot/NPR

No 'Cohabitation' For Alabama State's First Female President

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Drivers step out of their vehicles for a better view while stuck in traffic along Beijing's Second Ring Road on a "Car Free Day" on Sept. 21, 2010. For foreigners trying to drive in car-crazy China, the headaches begin with the written test. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

How I Flunked China's Driving Test ... Three Times

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