All Things Considered for May 7, 2014 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 7, 2014

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Desiree Metcalf, here with one of her three daughters, is one of many poor Americans who find themselves trapped in a system meant to help. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

War On Poverty, 50 Years Later

One Family's Story Shows How The Cycle Of Poverty Is Hard To Break

Like her own mother was, Desiree Metcalf is a young, single mom living in poverty. She doesn't have just one or two problems, but a whole pile of them.

Protesters march in front of the Nigerian Embassy in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday in support of the girls kidnapped by members of the Islamist group Boko Haram. Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov

U.S. Offers Aid In Search For Nigerian Girls, But Is It Too Late?

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Some universities have stopped investing in coal companies, but many others don't see the point. An aerial view of the Coal Hollow Mine in Utah in 2012. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

When Colleges Ditch Coal Investments, It's Barely A Drop In The Bucket

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Desiree Metcalf, here with one of her three daughters, is one of many poor Americans who find themselves trapped in a system meant to help. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

One Family's Story Shows How The Cycle Of Poverty Is Hard To Break

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Customers shop for produce at the Hunger Mountain Co-op in Montpelier, Vt., in 2013. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Vermont's GMO Bill Expected To Face Major Legal Challenges

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Being able to insert the two man-made letters into DNA, alongside the usual four-letter alphabet, could teach old cells new tricks and lead to better drugs, researchers say. courtesy of Synthorx hide caption

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courtesy of Synthorx

Chemists Expand Nature's Genetic Alphabet

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