All Things Considered for May 30, 2014 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 30, 2014

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Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994. James Whitmore/The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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James Whitmore/The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images

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Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

Ellison's exploration of race and identity won the National Book Award in 1953 and has been called one of the best novels of the 20th century.

National Security

An American Suicide Bomber In Syria

3 min

An American Suicide Bomber In Syria

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Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran, who is seeking his seventh term, is in a heated primary race with a Tea Party-backed challenger. Supporters of his opponent are accused of conspiring to photograph Cochran's bedridden wife. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

In Mississippi, A Senate Race Derailed By A Blogger's Photos

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The Times is making headlines for more than just its change in leadership; an internal review, which leaked to the press earlier this month, was intensely critical about how the newspaper has adapted to the digital era. AP hide caption

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AP

An Old-Fashioned Newspaperman Takes The Helm In A Digital World

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Filth is based on a novel by Irvine Welsh — who also wrote the profane, drug-fueled epic Trainspotting. James McAvoy plays Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson — a bigoted junkie cop — with enough foul-mouthed sleaze to be thoroughly off-putting. Neil Davidson/Magnolia Pictures hide caption

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Neil Davidson/Magnolia Pictures

James McAvoy As A Creep? In 'Filth,' The Anti-Typecasting Works

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Historian Patrick Grossi stops in front of 3711 Melon St. during a walking tour through Mantua. On Saturday, this house will be torn down — and will receive an elaborate memorial service. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

In Nod To History, A Crumbling Philly Row House Gets A Funeral

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Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994. James Whitmore/The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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James Whitmore/The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images

Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

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