All Things Considered for September 28, 2014 Hear the All Things Considered program for September 28, 2014

All Things Considered

Surrendered handguns are piled in a bin during a gun buyback event in Los Angeles on May 31, 2014. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Around the Nation

To Counter Gun Violence, Researchers Seek Deeper Data

For the first time in nearly 20 years, federal money is flowing into gun violence research. There's also growing momentum behind creating a reliable national database for firearm injuries and deaths.

Surrendered handguns are piled in a bin during a gun buyback event in Los Angeles on May 31, 2014. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

To Counter Gun Violence, Researchers Seek Deeper Data

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John Luther Adams' Pulitzer Prize-winning piece is called Become Ocean; the recording of the work comes out Sept. 30. Donald Lee/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Donald Lee/Courtesy of the artist

Deceptive Cadence

An Inviting Apocalypse

7 min

An Inviting Apocalypse

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Theaters that call themselves 4-D use lights, moving seats, fog and even sprays of water and air to give moviegoers a unique experience — one they hope audiences will consider worthy of higher ticket prices. Ernesto López Ruiz/Courtesy of CJ E&M America hide caption

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Ernesto López Ruiz/Courtesy of CJ E&M America

Movie Theaters Hope To Add Another Dimension To Their Profits

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Enrique Iglesias' song "Bailando" — with versions in Spanish and in Spanglish — has hit big both on the Latin pop charts and the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. EnriqueIglesiasVEVO/YouTube hide caption

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EnriqueIglesiasVEVO/YouTube

How Did 'Bailando' Become A Spanglish Crossover Hit?

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Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

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