All Things Considered for November 9, 2014 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 9, 2014

All Things Considered

Tacheles, a squat in the central district of Mitte, 1990. Spots like this one often became clubs or art spaces in the years following German reunification. Ben de Biel hide caption

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Ben de Biel

Music News

In Berlin, A Beat That Bloomed From Rubble

Today Berlin is a techno hot spot. The scene has its roots in the fall of the Berlin Wall, when young people from East and West got together in abandoned buildings to dance and celebrate together.

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Lower oil prices, while good for the economy, are a threat to what has been a dramatic surge in oil production in the U.S. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Low Gas Prices Haven't Slowed Domestic Drilling — Yet

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The airline industry is predicting more people will take to the skies this Thanksgiving than in any year since the start of the recession. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Holiday Travelers Should Expect Packed Planes, Higher Fares

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First Plane Home Flamin' Groovies

The Normandy American Cemetery is home to hundreds of American World War II veterans, including Eugene Vigosky. Samantha Broderick/WITF hide caption

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Samantha Broderick/WITF

Friend's Visit To Veteran's Normandy Grave Gives Family Closure

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Sonata for violin & piano No. 26 in B flat major, K. 378 (K. 317d) [1. Allegro moderato] Ani Kavafian

Tacheles, a squat in the central district of Mitte, 1990. Spots like this one often became clubs or art spaces in the years following German reunification. Ben de Biel hide caption

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Ben de Biel

In Berlin, A Beat That Bloomed From Rubble

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Robert Lee Watt was a member of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for more than three decades. Courtesy of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers hide caption

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Courtesy of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

'The Black Horn': Blowing Past Classical Music's Color Barriers

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L'oiseau de feu (The Firebird), concert suite for orchestra No. 2 [Finale] Budapest Festival Orchestra, Ivan Fischer (conductor)

James Earl Jones was born in Mississippi and grew up in Michigan. He was adopted by his grandparents and eventually developed a stutter. "I'm still a stutterer," he says. "I just work with it." Stephen Chernin/AP hide caption

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Stephen Chernin/AP

James Earl Jones: From Stutterer To Janitor To Broadway Star

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United Will Rise Again Clint Mansell
Lullabye Ben Folds Five

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