All Things Considered for May 11, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 11, 2015

All Things Considered

The twisting Shanghai Tower (right) is the world's second-tallest building and opens soon. Shen Zhonghai/Gensler hide caption

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Shen Zhonghai/Gensler

Parallels

Shanghai Tower: A Crown For The City's Futuristic Skyline

The 2,073-foot-tall Shanghai Tower, the world's second-tallest building, opens this year. More than just a skyscraper, it's a symbol of Shanghai's — and China's — soaring ambitions.

Nouf al-Mazrou, with the red head scarf in the center, runs a barbeque catering business from her home in the Saudi capital Riyadh. She's shown here at a gathering of Saudi women who have launched businesses on Instagram. The event was held at a private girls school. Deborah Amos / NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos / NPR

Saudi Women Can't Drive To Work; So They're Flocking To The Internet

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Stronger (What Doesn't Kill You) Kelly Clarkson
Arida Exxasens

Sheron Bazille pays $219.01 a month for her health insurance. She knows the amount down to the penny. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Tales From 3 Louisianans Who Got Subsidized Health Insurance

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More than 80 percent of the people getting federal subsidies to defray the cost of their monthly health insurance premiums have jobs, statistics suggest. And many are middle class. Jen Grantham/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jen Grantham/iStockphoto

Low, Middle Income Workers Most Vulnerable To Loss Of Obamacare Subsidies

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Halcyon Days Mokhov
Don't Ease Me In [#][Instrumental] Grateful Dead

The twisting Shanghai Tower (right) is the world's second-tallest building and opens soon. Shen Zhonghai/Gensler hide caption

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Shen Zhonghai/Gensler

Shanghai Tower: A Crown For The City's Futuristic Skyline

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Brazil spent billions renovating and building World Cup stadiums. Almost a year after the tournament ended, the nation is still trying to figure out what to do with them. The Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia, Brazil (shown here in April 2014), was the most expensive of the stadiums — at a cost of $550 million — and is now being used as a bus parking lot. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazil's World Cup Legacy Includes $550M Stadium-Turned-Parking Lot

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Double Down Sound Defects

Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods has created an Internet interface so customers can zoom in and view information about specific koa trees from their computers. Courtesy of Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods hide caption

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Courtesy of Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods

Using Investments And Technology To Rebuild Hawaii's Koa Forests

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Ukelele Blues New Hawaiian All Star Band
Plastic, Texas Surf Guitar Villians

Nikki Jones' preschool class at Porter Early Childhood Development Center in Tulsa, Okla. The state offers free preschool for all kids. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

Preschool By State: Who's Spending And What's It Buying?

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Composure B. Fleischmann
Setting Sail in April By the End of Tonight
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Prince, seen here speaking during the Grammys, will perform May 9 in Baltimore. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Songs We Love: Prince, 'Baltimore'

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Baltimore Prince
Cecilia Ann Pixies

Tanimura & Antle workers use tractors to install drip tape into fields that will be used to grow lettuce and other crops in California's Salinas Valley. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Why California Farmers Are Conflicted About Using Less Water

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Tastebud [#][Instrumental] Grateful Dead

An image from a video made by photographer Aaron Mischel which featured the song "Happy" by the band Secrets in Stereo. Aaron Mischel/YouTube hide caption

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Aaron Mischel/YouTube

Tiny Music Royalties Add Up, Unexpectedly

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Fast Lane Husky Rescue

Yae and Ren were married during Tokyo's Rainbow Pride Weekend in April. One Tokyo ward, or neighborhood, has recognized same-sex marriages, becoming the first place in Japan — or anywhere in East Asia — to do so. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

The First Place In East Asia To Welcome Same-Sex Marriage

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Beyond God & Elvis From Monument to Masses
Where's My Thing?/Here It Is [Drum Solo] Rush
I Fought the Law Bobby Fuller
My Story

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