All Things Considered for May 27, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 27, 2015

All Things Considered

Soldiers participate in close arm combative training during the Ranger Course at Ft. Benning. Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/U.S. Army hide caption

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Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/U.S. Army

Back At Base

Women Fight Their Way Through Army's Grueling Ranger School

Two years after the Defense Department lifted the ban on women serving in combat units, the Army is allowing women to go through the training program for soldiers who aspire to be infantry leaders.

A member of Iraq's government forces battling Islamic State fighters in Anbar province earlier this month. Haidar Hamdani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdani/AFP/Getty Images

For Next President, The Fight Against Extremism Will Hit Closer To Home

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Detroit is attracting entrepreneurs who like the relatively cheap workspaces. But real estate developers and business owners like Sean Harrington, who turned the Iodent Building into an apartment complex, are paying the price in property taxes. Jason Margolis/NPR hide caption

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Jason Margolis/NPR

On The Road To Recovery, Detroit's Property Taxes Aren't Helping

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Dr. David Muller, dean of medical education at Mount Sinai, believes that including in each medical school class some students who have a strong background in the humanities makes traditional science students better doctors, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien for NPR

A Top Medical School Revamps Requirements To Lure English Majors

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License plate scanners have helped police locate stolen vehicles and have even assisted in murder investigations. But with their ability to track a person's every move, skeptics worry about privacy. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Questions Remain About How To Use Data From License Plate Scanners

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Soldiers participate in close arm combative training during the Ranger Course at Ft. Benning. Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/U.S. Army hide caption

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Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/U.S. Army

Women Fight Their Way Through Army's Grueling Ranger School

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Oscar Paz Suaznabar started playing keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The now 9-year-old pianist has played at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center. Courtesy Oscar Paz Suaznabar hide caption

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Courtesy Oscar Paz Suaznabar

When This 9-Year-Old Pianist Plays, He Feels The Music

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