All Things Considered for June 10, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for June 10, 2015

All Things Considered

Actor David Gulpilil gives a genuinely wrenching performance in Charlie's Country Courtesy of Monument Releasing hide caption

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Courtesy of Monument Releasing

Movie Reviews

'Charlie's Country': A Worn Landscape That's Both Sad And Majestic

NPR's Bob Mondello reviews a dramatic film about an aboriginal hunter who yearns for a life in Australia, like the one his parents had.

Drexel Siok, environmental scientist at Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve, holds a horseshoe crab that's been tagged on Kitts Hummock Beach near Dover, Del. During the annual count volunteers make a note if they find a tagged crab. Researchers then use the information to learn where crabs are moving over time. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

It's Spawning Season: Are Horseshoe Crabs Down For the Count?

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Renee Mitchell says even though she has health insurance she'll have trouble paying for the eye surgery she needs to save her vision. Jim Burress/WABE hide caption

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Jim Burress/WABE

Some Insured Patients Still Skipping Care Because Of High Costs

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A number of state lawmakers have passed bills to bolster body cameras or have more streamlined investigations of police shootings. But State Rep. Michael Butler (D-St. Louis) says, "Folks in Missouri are afraid to have the race conversation." Michael Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Thomas/Getty Images

Missouri Slow To Advance A Post-Ferguson Agenda

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Texas' agricultural commissioner wants to do away with a decade-old ban on deep fryers and soda machines in schools. Josh Banks/iStockphoto hide caption

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Josh Banks/iStockphoto

Freedom With Fries? Texas Official Wants Deep Fryers Back In Schools

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Actor David Gulpilil gives a genuinely wrenching performance in Charlie's Country Courtesy of Monument Releasing hide caption

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Courtesy of Monument Releasing

'Charlie's Country': A Worn Landscape That's Both Sad And Majestic

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A woman on a street in Seoul checks her cellphone. The government is ramping up efforts to control an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome by monitoring the smartphones of those under quarantine. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Creepy Or Comforting? South Korea Tracks Smartphones To Curb MERS

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An artist's conception of how Saturn's immense Phoebe ring might appear to eyes sensitive to infrared wavelengths. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Saturn's Dark And Mysterious Outer Ring Is Even Bigger Than Expected

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Michael Giacchino (left), pictured with director Colin Trevorrow, composed the music for this summer's Jurassic World, the latest score in a prolific, blockbuster career. Maria Giacchino hide caption

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Maria Giacchino

Michael Giacchino On Coming Home To Write Music For 'Jurassic World'

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