All Things Considered for June 13, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for June 13, 2015

All Things Considered

Greg Kay decided to raise his son Linken, 10, to speak Esperanto as his native tongue. When Greg was younger, he traveled around South Korea, biking between Esperanto-speaking homes. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

Goats and Soda

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback?

A hundred years ago, a Polish physician created a language that anyone could learn easily. The hope was to bring the world closer together. Today Esperanto speakers say it's helpful during travel.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faces charges of NCAA violations including the existence of sham classes and grade inflation for student-athletes. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Academic Foul: Some Colleges Accused Of Helping Athletes Cheat

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In the Navy The Village People
Finding Home (Farewell Version) (Instrumental) Zack Hemsey
Funeral March of a Marionette [Theme from Alfred Hitchcock Presents]

Greg Kay decided to raise his son Linken, 10, to speak Esperanto as his native tongue. When Greg was younger, he traveled around South Korea, biking between Esperanto-speaking homes. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback?

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Smooth Sailin' Bridges, Leon
Golden Dead Man Winter

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