All Things Considered for June 16, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for June 16, 2015

All Things Considered

Nigerian fans stand and deliver cheers at a match against Australia, played during the Women's World Cup in Winnipeg, Canada. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Russell Lewis/NPR

Goats and Soda

Nigerian Soccer Fans Really Know How To Have A Ball

The U.S. team, which plays Nigeria tonight at the Women's World Cup, is a tournament favorite. But Nigeria's funtastic fans deserve a cup of their own.

Mohammad and Linda Jomaa al-Halabi, along with their five daughters, are among the fewer than 1,000 Syrian refugees who have been resettled in the U.S. They left Syria in August 2012 and arrived last year in Baltimore, where they live now. Michele Kelemen/NPR hide caption

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Michele Kelemen/NPR

Of 4 Million Syrian Refugees, The U.S. Has Taken Fewer Than 1,000

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Microwave popcorn containing trans fats from November 2013. The Grocery Manufacturers Association says the industry has lowered the amount of trans fat added to food products by more than 86 percent. But trans fats can still be found in some processed food items. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov

The Salt

FDA To Food Companies: This Time, Zero Means Zero Trans Fats

3 min

FDA To Food Companies: This Time, Zero Means Zero Trans Fats

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Hillary Clinton, featured in a high school yearbook with the student council. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Tamara Keith/NPR

Growing Up In Protected Americana, Hillary Clinton Looked Outside The Cocoon

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Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney co-star in the new Amazon romantic comedy, Catastrophe. Ed Miller/Channel 4 hide caption

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Ed Miller/Channel 4

Amazon's 'Catastrophe' Isn't One — Unlike Some TV Rom-Coms

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Nigerian fans stand and deliver cheers at a match against Australia, played during the Women's World Cup in Winnipeg, Canada. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Russell Lewis/NPR

Goats and Soda

Nigerian Soccer Fans Really Know How To Have A Ball

2 min

Nigerian Soccer Fans Really Know How To Have A Ball

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Anouar Brahem's new album Souvenance is a response to the Arab Spring, steeped in four years of personal reflection. Arthur Perset/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Arthur Perset/Courtesy of the artist

'A Lot Of Hope And A Lot Of Fear': Anouar Brahem's Arab Spring Remembrance

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Schoolgirls in Ethiopia examine a new feminine product: underwear with a pocket for a menstrual pad. Courtesy of Be Girl Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.

People Are Finally Talking About The Thing Nobody Wants To Talk About

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Fernando Urias (left) and Victor Manuel Aguirre kiss after they learned they were allowed to marry, during a protest outside the municipal palace in the northern border city of Mexicali, Mexico, on Jan. 17. Alex Cossio/AP hide caption

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Alex Cossio/AP

Parallels

How Mexico Quietly Legalized Same-Sex Marriage

2 min

How Mexico Quietly Legalized Same-Sex Marriage

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