All Things Considered for June 24, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for June 24, 2015

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Archaeologists in Madrid study remains buried under the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians on Jan. 24. Tests proved the remains belonged to Miguel de Cervantes, the author of Don Quixote. Cervantes wanted to be buried at the convent because the nuns raised money and paid a ransom for his release when he was a young man held captive in North Africa. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

Parallels

The Reason Cervantes Asked To Be Buried Under A Convent

Tests have confirmed the bones under a Madrid convent belong to Spain's most famous writer. He wished to be buried there because the nuns raised money and paid a ransom when he was captive in Africa.

On July 9, 2013, opponents and supporters of a bill to put restrictions on abortion hold signs near a news conference outside the Texas Capitol in Austin. The bill was passed, but has been battled in the courts for two years; now, the law is set to go into effect July 1. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Texas Abortion Curbs Go Into Effect Soon, Unless Supreme Court Acts

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Archaeologists in Madrid study remains buried under the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians on Jan. 24. Tests proved the remains belonged to Miguel de Cervantes, the author of Don Quixote. Cervantes wanted to be buried at the convent because the nuns raised money and paid a ransom for his release when he was a young man held captive in North Africa. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

The Reason Cervantes Asked To Be Buried Under A Convent

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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Rainer Schoch/Nature

The Two-Way

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

2 min

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

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Harry Lawrence Freeman, the Harlem Renaissance composer of the opera Voodoo. H. Lawrence Freeman Papers, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University hide caption

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H. Lawrence Freeman Papers, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University

Deceptive Cadence

Unearthed In A Library, 'Voodoo' Opera Rises Again

5 min

Unearthed In A Library, 'Voodoo' Opera Rises Again

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