All Things Considered for August 30, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for August 30, 2015

All Things Considered

Patty Wagstaff is a fixture at air shows. She became the first woman to win the U.S. National Aerobatic Championship in 1991, and her winning plane (not pictured) is on display at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum in Washington D.C. Doug Gardner/Patty Wagstaff Airshows, Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Doug Gardner/Patty Wagstaff Airshows, Inc.

My Big Break

An Aerobatics Pilot Spins (And Rolls, And Loops) A Career From A Crash

Award-winning aviator Patty Wagstaff tackles the extreme, but she was inspired by a simple takeoff gone wrong. Crawling out of the plane, she looked at her pilot and thought, "I can do a lot better."

Two octopuses going at it — or, as marine biologist Peter Godfrey-Smith might put it, engaging in a bit of "ornery" behavior. Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence. hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence.

WATCH: Octopuses Appear To Take Up Arms As Submarine Warfare Escalates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436085657/436107521" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

California condors have enormous wingspans. That's fine in the wilderness, but when a bird of this size encounters a power line, the results can be fatal. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a program to help train birds to avoid the hazard. Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

Small Shocks Help Enormous Birds Learn To Avoid Power Lines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435822384/436107533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patty Wagstaff is a fixture at air shows. She became the first woman to win the U.S. National Aerobatic Championship in 1991, and her winning plane (not pictured) is on display at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum in Washington D.C. Doug Gardner/Patty Wagstaff Airshows, Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Doug Gardner/Patty Wagstaff Airshows, Inc.

An Aerobatics Pilot Spins (And Rolls, And Loops) A Career From A Crash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/433515500/436107539" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dee Dee Bridgewater's new album, Dee Dee's Feathers, mines the rich history of New Orleans music. Greg Miles/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Miles/Courtesy of the artist

Dee Dee Bridgewater's Joyous Gift To New Orleans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435204017/436107545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All Things Considered