All Things Considered for September 7, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for September 7, 2015

All Things Considered

Ellsworth Ashman lost his middle-skill job at Entenmann's on Long Island, N.Y., last year. Now he's working at a job that pays half of what he made at the bakery. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

Economy

Despite Recovery, Middle-Wage Workers Are Being Squeezed Out

Most jobs added since the recession are going to workers either in the top third or the bottom third of income. Those in the middle are getting squeezed out — especially men.

With mesh backpacks slung over their shoulders, inmates walk to school at San Quentin State Prison. Inmates have the chance to earn an associate of arts degree here through the Prison University Project. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Why Aren't There More Higher Ed Programs Behind Bars?

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Marquette University scientist Michael Schläppi grows rice in paddies on his lab's rooftop. Michael Schläppi hide caption

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Michael Schläppi

The Salt

Rice Finds A Welcome Home In Wisconsin Paddies

3 min

Rice Finds A Welcome Home In Wisconsin Paddies

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Ellsworth Ashman lost his middle-skill job at Entenmann's on Long Island, N.Y., last year. Now he's working at a job that pays half of what he made at the bakery. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

Despite Recovery, Middle-Wage Workers Are Being Squeezed Out

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When passengers board his train on the Washington, D.C., subway system, they hear Lamour Rogers' pleasing baritone over the public address system. Christina Cala/NPR hide caption

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Christina Cala/NPR

Metro Driver's Booming Voice Connects Washington, D.C., Commuters

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All Things Considered