All Things Considered for September 30, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for September 30, 2015

All Things Considered

A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Shots - Health News

Disgraced Scientist Clones Dogs, And Critics Question His Intent

A lab in Seoul is the only place in the world known to commercially clone dogs. But often the dog clones are sickly, critics say, and many other dogs are subjected to surgery to make a clone.

A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Disgraced Scientist Clones Dogs, And Critics Question His Intent

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David Whitcomb of Waynesboro, Va., says he paid a premium for the diesel engine on his 2015 Passat TDI because he thought it would mean fewer emissions. Courtesy of David Whitcomb hide caption

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Courtesy of David Whitcomb

Volkswagen Owners Wonder Where A Fix Will Leave Them

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None of the biocontainment treatment centers in U.S. hospitals were specifically designed for kids — until now. Texas Children's Hospital aims to fill that gap. Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital hide caption

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Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital

Kids With Ebola, Bird Flu Or TB? Texas Children's Hospital Will Be Ready

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Matt Damon portrays an astronaut who relies on science to survive on a hostile planet. Giles Keyte/EPKTV hide caption

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Giles Keyte/EPKTV

How 'The Martian' Became A Science Love Story

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