All Things Considered for October 31, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 31, 2015

All Things Considered

Lynda Trang Dai sits inside her restaurant, Lynda Sandwich, in Orange County, Calif. Lisa Morehouse/For NPR hide caption

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Lisa Morehouse/For NPR

The Salt

At This Sandwich Shop, A Vietnamese Pop Star Serves Up Banh Mi

Lynda Trang Dai, known as the "Vietnamese Madonna," performs around the world. Back home in California, she's got a different starring role: she's the only one to whip up her sandwiches' secret sauce.

In 2005, when she was 12 years old, Ricki Mudd (center) traveled to China to meet her birth father Wu Jin Cai, birth brother Wu Chao and birth mother Xu Xian Zhen. Mudd had been given up for adoption after Wu Chao was born; her family wanted a son, and her parents were limited to one child. Courtesy of Ricky Mudd hide caption

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Courtesy of Ricky Mudd

From Only Child To Older Sister To Adoptee, Under China's One-Child Policy

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Way of the Samurai Deceptikon
Fall [Instrumental] [Instrumental] Rhye
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Smash Hit
Swinging Brick J-Walk

Rob Poirier sits next to John Boehner most days at Pete's Diner. Courtesy Rob Poirier hide caption

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Courtesy Rob Poirier

Pete's Diner, Where John Boehner Can Be A 'Regular Guy'

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Lynda Trang Dai sits inside her restaurant, Lynda Sandwich, in Orange County, Calif. Lisa Morehouse/For NPR hide caption

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Lisa Morehouse/For NPR

At This Sandwich Shop, A Vietnamese Pop Star Serves Up Banh Mi

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A still image from Guillermo del Toro's new movie, Crimson Peak. Twenty-two percent of audiences on any given weekend are Latino. But when it comes to horror films, that proportion jumps to as much as half the box office. Universal Pictures hide caption

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Universal Pictures

Why Latinos Heart Horror Films

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Black Cat [Video Mix/Short Solo] Janet Jackson
Superstition Stevie Wonder

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