All Things Considered for November 11, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 11, 2015

All Things Considered

Students cheer while listening to protesters, following the announcement that Tim Wolfe, the president of the University of Missouri System, would resign. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

NPR Ed

With Campus Racism, How Can College Presidents Get it Right?

The resignation of the head of the University of Missouri System raises an important question: How should he have responded?

Chew, Chew, Chew (Your Bubble Gum) Ella Fitzgerald & Chick Webb & His Orchestra
Bombay 405 Miles Dan the Automator
Raining Patterns CFCF
Electric Feel MGMT

Students cheer while listening to protesters, following the announcement that Tim Wolfe, the president of the University of Missouri System, would resign. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

With Campus Racism, How Can College Presidents Get It Right?

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Butterfly Delicate Steve
Caracol [Chancha Ft. Wenceslada Remix] Tremor
Kennedy Ratatat
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Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gives to Me [Alternate Take] Sidney Bechet
Eyes Be Closed Washed Out
Augusta Falls Melodium
Race Course (Instrumental) The Shanghai Restoration Project

Veterans groups, like the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars, are struggling to recruit and engage younger veterans who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Established Veterans Groups Fight To Attract The Next Generation

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Ponyhead Saru
Pumped Up Kicks Foster the People

The drug sold as K2, spike, spice or "synthetic marijuana" may look like dried marijuana leaves. But it's really any of a combination of chemicals created in a lab that are then sprayed on dried plant material. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Surge In Use Of 'Synthetic Marijuana' Still One Step Ahead Of The Law

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Vibe Drive Podington Bear

Kalu James moved to Austin, Texas, eight years ago, but bought health insurance for the first time this year. Twenty percent of the city's musicians live below the federal poverty line. Veronica Zaragovia/KUT hide caption

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Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

Musicians Struggle To Buy Insurance In A City That Thrives On Music

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Your Hand In Mine Explosions in the Sky
April's Song Real Estate

Granola cereals on a shelf in Glenview, Ill. "If the FDA were to create a more strict, more comprehensive definition, it would give manufacturers a lot more guidance on whether or not they could use the term 'natural' on their food products," says lawyer Ivan Wasserman. Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

What's 'Natural' Food? The Government Isn't Sure And Wants Your Input

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Researchers at Brown University's computer science department are studying whether a robot called Baxter can be taught to pick up different objects. Joe Palca/NPR hide caption

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Joe Palca/NPR

How Can Robots Learn New Tasks? Practice, Practice, Practice

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The Lazy Song The Shady Ukelele Band
Monsters Jim Guthrie

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