All Things Considered for December 15, 2015 Hear the All Things Considered program for December 15, 2015

All Things Considered

Shoppers in Freeport, Maine, pass by store windows advertising Black Friday deals after the stores opened their doors at midnight. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Business

Shoppers This Year May Need The Nudge Of Cold Air And Gift Cards

It's been warmer than usual around the country and hardly feels like gift-giving season. Some economists say December sales will be fine after Christmas when consumers shop for sales with gift cards.

Get ready for your email inbox to be inundated this election season. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

'Bill Wants To Meet You': Why Political Fundraising Emails Work

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Glamour's Sophia Chabbott poses in the outfit she wore to her Orthodox Jewish divorce ceremony. Kelly Sherin for Glamour.com hide caption

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Kelly Sherin for Glamour.com

Looking For A Podcast? Try 'What I Wore When ...'

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You Wear It Well Rod Stewart
My Mustang Ford Chuck Berry
Pricks of Brightness Ratatat
Night Work Scissor Sisters
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Would You Want Me Generationals
Saturday Morning Melodium
The New Year Random Forest
Music For a Found Harmonium Patrick Street
Steppin' Out John Mayall
Dusk to Dawn Emancipator
Out of This World Michael Menert
5AM Glen Porter

South Sudanese seeking refuge line up to register at the U.N.'s base in Bentiu in February. At that time, the camp was receiving up to 200 new people a day. It now serves as home to some 100,000 people. Charles Lomodong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Lomodong/AFP/Getty Images

U.N. Bases Turn Into Cities For Desperate And Displaced In South Sudan

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Montanita Ratatat
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Montanita
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Classics
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Ratatat

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Step Right Up (Pour Yourself Some Wine) Alex Bleeker & the Freaks

Shoppers in Freeport, Maine, pass by store windows advertising Black Friday deals after the stores opened their doors at midnight. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Shoppers This Year May Need The Nudge Of Cold Air And Gift Cards

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Wonderful Christmastime The Shins
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Wonderful Christmastime
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Holidays Rule
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The Shins

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China's Cyberspace Administration minister Lu Wei (second from right) and other officials attend the opening ceremony of the Light of the Internet Expo on Tuesday as part of the Second World Internet Conference, which starts Wednesday. Lu has said that controlling the Internet is about as easy as "nailing Jell-O to the wall." Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov

China's Internet Forum May Provide A Peek At Its Cyber-Ambitions

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Time Won't Tell El-P
Pacific Theme Broken Social Scene

Be My Eyes pairs blind people with sighted volunteers who help them identify objects using a smartphone app and camera. Be My Eyes hide caption

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Be My Eyes

Help A Blind Person Identify Everyday Things, Via Smartphone App

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A New Beginning Fantastic Negrito
Beach Comber Real Estate

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