All Things Considered for January 31, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for January 31, 2016

All Things Considered

Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Words You'll Hear

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

To economists, the phrase means job seekers roughly equal job openings. Unemployment is at 5 percent, but depending on where you live, your race or your education level, you still might not find work.

Iraqi families displaced from the areas of Hawija and Hamrin in northern Iraq traveled to Kirkuk governorate in search of safety on Aug. 31. Thousands continue to flee ISIS-held areas. Marwan Ibrahim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marwan Ibrahim/AFP/Getty Images

As Noose Tightens Around ISIS In Iraq, Civilians Flee Hunger And Cold

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The Process of Leaving E-vax
Acid Raindrops (Instrumental) People Under The Stairs

Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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Lori Barlow gave up a six-figure salary as a financial planner and a home on the beach to help people make the near impossible leap from shelter to home. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Not Giving Up: Arizona Residents Get A New Start In Refurbished Motel

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Kirk Franklin tries to create a "horizontal Jesus" on his new album, Losing My Religion. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Gospel Star Kirk Franklin Wants To Help You Lose Your Religion

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Losing My Religion Kirk Franklin
Cold Iron Mike Vass
Tango Chill Cocktail Party Jazz Music All Stars

Carolina "Maria" Hurtado in the now abandoned maternity ward of the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, where she was sterilized four decades ago. Renee Tajima-Peña hide caption

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Renee Tajima-Peña

Film Portrays A 'Perfect Storm' That Led To Unwanted Sterilizations For Many Latinas

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"Market Symphony" is a new audio installation at the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. The exhibition layers sound from a market in Lagos, Nigeria. The speakers are installed on enamelware trays which are often used in markets. Courtesy of the National Museum of African Art hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Museum of African Art

Symphony Of The City: Nigerian Artist Draws Songs From The Bustling Market

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Ja Fun Mi Dub [Instrumental] Adé, King Sunny And His African Beats
Palm Wine Sound [Instrumental] Fela Kuti

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