All Things Considered for February 3, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for February 3, 2016

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British Prime Minister David Cameron wants to cut migration, and part of the government's plan calls for some foreign workers to leave if they are making less than 35,000 pounds (about $50,000) annually. Ben Pruchnie/Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Pruchnie/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Parallels

Britain To Foreign Workers: If You Don't Make $50,000 A Year, Please Leave

To reduce the number of foreign workers, some of those making less than $50,000 won't qualify to stay in Britain beyond April. Critics say the deal would cause labor shortages.

During more cordial times, Donald Trump (left) talks with New Hampshire Union Leader Publisher Joe McQuaid during a Politics and Eggs breakfast in Manchester, N.H., in 2014. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole/AP

New Hampshire Newspaper Publisher: 'Trump Has Overturned The Table'

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Indigenous people attend the trial of two army officers accused of keeping Mayan Indian women as sex slaves during Guatemala's 36-year civil war. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images

Mayan Women Accuse Military Officials Of Holding Them As Sex Slaves

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Prosecutor Robert Zauzmer (left) from the U.S. attorney's office in Philadelphia will head up the Justice Department's effort on pardons. Brad Bower/AP hide caption

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Brad Bower/AP

New Pardon Chief In Obama Justice Department Inherits A Huge Backlog

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When so-called senescent cells were removed from mice, they were healthier and lived longer than mice that still had the cells. Philippe Merle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Merle/AFP/Getty Images

Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter

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British Prime Minister David Cameron wants to cut migration, and part of the government's plan calls for some foreign workers to leave if they are making less than 35,000 pounds (about $50,000) annually. Ben Pruchnie/Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Pruchnie/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Britain To Foreign Workers: If You Don't Make $50,000 A Year, Please Leave

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A patient suffering from Guillain-Barre syndrome recovers in a hospital ward in San Salvador on Jan. 27. Researchers are trying to determine whether there is a link between the disorder, which can cause weakness and paralysis, and the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Marvin Recinos /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Recinos /AFP/Getty Images

CDC Sees Major Challenges Ahead In The Fight Against Zika

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Scientists have the ability to use DNA from three adults to make one embryo. But should they? A. Dudzinski/Science Source hide caption

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A. Dudzinski/Science Source

Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says

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A customer looks at a book at Amazon Books, the first brick-and-mortar retail store for the online retail giant, on Nov. 3 in Seattle. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Is Amazon Planning Hundreds Of Bookstores? Analysts Doubt It

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Guillermo & Joaquin, 2013. Catherine Opie/Courtesy of Regen Projects, Los Angeles hide caption

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Catherine Opie/Courtesy of Regen Projects, Los Angeles

'I Do Like To Stare': Catherine Opie On Her Portraits Of Modern America

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