All Things Considered for March 21, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 21, 2016

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An undated picture provided by the official Korean Central News Agency earlier this month shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un talking with scientists and technicians. North Korea's nuclear warhead was jokingly dubbed "the disco ball," but experts say the spherical device, while likely a model, is probably based on a real nuclear weapons design. KCNA/EPA via Corbis hide caption

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KCNA/EPA via Corbis

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Why Analysts Aren't Laughing At These Silly North Korean Photos

North Korea's bombastic propaganda and unpredictable leadership have made it a topic of frequent parody. But experts say it's time to take the nation's nuclear capabilities more seriously.

Standing water and abandoned tires make Houston's Fifth Ward hospitable for mosquitoes. Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography

Houston Prepares Now For Zika's Potential Arrival This Summer

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Hector Moreno checks a basement for lead paint in Baltimore. He is an environmental assessor with Green and Healthy Homes. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Baltimore Struggles To Protect Children From Lead Paint

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Wally Wilder Delicate Steve
Chase Me Hexstatic
My Burr Minotaur Shock
Weekend Smith Westerns

Jaime Caetano was convicted of violating Massachusetts' ban on stun guns after one was found in her purse. Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images

Are Stun Guns Protected By Second Amendment? Supreme Court Suggests Yes

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Dope VHS Master Desmond Cheese

Indian business tycoon Vijay Mallya, the owner of Kingfisher Airlines, gets into his car outside Parliament in New Delhi, India, in 2013. Mallya, who owes large sums on loans to his businesses, recently left the country for Britain, according to reports. Saurabh Das/AP hide caption

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Saurabh Das/AP

Indian Tycoon Leaves The Country Amid Criminal Investigation

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African Velvet Air
My Guru Dan the Automator

Workers place the berries directly into the plastic clamshell packages that shoppers will find in stores. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

In Florida, Strawberry Fields Are Not Forever

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If I Can't Win The Cactus Blossoms
Jazzhole Free the Robots

An undated picture provided by the official Korean Central News Agency earlier this month shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un talking with scientists and technicians. North Korea's nuclear warhead was jokingly dubbed "the disco ball," but experts say the spherical device, while likely a model, is probably based on a real nuclear weapons design. KCNA/EPA via Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
KCNA/EPA via Corbis

Why Analysts Aren't Laughing At These Silly North Korean Photos

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Spring Jam Alex Bleeker & the Freaks
Blue Drag Allen Toussaint
Strange Constellations Bombay Dub Orchestra
TV Queen Wild Nothing

A plainclothes police officer kicks a demonstrator as Turkish anti-riot police disperse supporters in front of the headquarters of the Turkish daily Zaman newspaper in Istanbul on March 5. Turkish authorities seized the headquarters in a midnight raid. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Amid Crackdown In Turkey, Dissatisfaction With President Erdogan Grows

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Phones and Machines B. Flesichmann

The 227-year-old law at the center of the Apple-FBI debate has withstood several challenges, including at the Supreme Court. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

How A Gambling Case Does, And Doesn't, Apply To The iPhone Debate

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Parma Panorama Sunmonx
La Cumbia Perdida Doctor Stereo

When Cuban singer Dayme Arocena performed at SXSW, "everybody in the place fell in love with her," says NPR Music's Felix Contreras. Casey Moore/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Casey Moore/Courtesy of the artist

At South By Southwest, The Sounds Of Cuba Come To Texas

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Go!Amigo TF Boys
Guitar Noir Aqua Velvets

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