All Things Considered for March 22, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 22, 2016

All Things Considered

More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Public Health Image Library/CDC

Shots - Health News

Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger

Forty-seven years after a vaccine against rubella was created, the virus still harms about 300 newborns every day, worldwide. Even a cheap vaccine can be a financial burden for poorer countries.

Matt McEntee (left) works on fixing a small motor with Tim Ledlie at the Mt. Pleasant Library in Washington, D.C., on Sunday. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

For Adults, Lifelong Learning Happens The Old Fashioned Way

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The Fall Apart Song Podington Bear
The Contender Menahan Street Band

Bassam Aramin, 46, grew up hating Israel and spent seven years in an Israeli prison. But he gradually came to believe that negotiation, not violence, was the only way to resolve the conflict. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

A Palestinian Takes A Different Road In His Fight

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Go!Amigo TF Boys
Under Cover Ducktails
Happiness The Foreign Exchange
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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Public Health Image Library/CDC

Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger

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Heard About You Last Night Mogwai
Cirrus Bonobo
Eitheror Little People
Lady Luck Richard Swift
Given You Nothing Film
Garden Cut Chemist
Sandias Virtual Boy
Wraith Pinned to the Mist and Other Games Of Montreal

An evangelical Christian pilgrim from the U.S. waves during a parade in Jerusalem last October in an annual show of support for Israel. Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images

Evangelicals Key To Republican Support For Israel

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Fantino Sebastien Tellier

On June 26, 2015, just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court validated same-sex marriages, Dennis Clark (center left) and Mark Henderson exchanged vows in Midtown Memphis. This photo, later posted on Facebook, led to their suspension from Freemasons by the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. Courtesy of Leanne McConnell hide caption

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Courtesy of Leanne McConnell

For Freemasons, Is Banning Gays Or Being Gay Un-Masonic?

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Truckstop Mothers Lazlo Hollyfeld
Lovers' Carvings Bibio
Nine Mr. Cooper
Sweat Moss of Aura

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