All Things Considered for April 11, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for April 11, 2016

All Things Considered

Maasai men in Kenya share a laugh. The way we laugh with others offers clues to our relationship with them. Jonathan & Angela Scott/AWL Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan & Angela Scott/AWL Images RM/Getty Images

Goats and Soda

Ha ha HA Haha. The Sound Of Laughter Tells More Than You Think

Laughter turns out to be a universal language in more ways than we realize.

Zhenan Bao, a chemical engineer at Stanford University, is working to invent an artificial skin from plastic that can sense, heal and power itself. The thin plastic sheets are made with built-in pressure sensors. Bao Research Group hide caption

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Bao Research Group

Just Like Human Skin, This Plastic Sheet Can Sense And Heal

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Beverly Cleary, shown during a story hour in the park, was a children's librarian before she became an author. "Boys particularly asked: Where were the books about kids like us? And there weren't any at that time," she recalls. Courtesy of HarperCollins hide caption

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Courtesy of HarperCollins

Beverly Cleary Is Turning 100, But She Has Always Thought Like A Kid

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Maasai men in Kenya share a laugh. The way we laugh with others offers clues to our relationship with them. Jonathan & Angela Scott/AWL Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan & Angela Scott/AWL Images RM/Getty Images

Ha ha HA Haha. The Sound Of Laughter Tells More Than You Think

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A lucky few stay healthy despite carrying genetic defects linked to serious diseases. What protects them? Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

How Do 'Genetic Superheroes' Overcome Their Bad DNA?

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Teenagers sit on a new sign reading "Cidade Olimpica" (Olympic City) in Rio de Janeiro's port district last October. Ahead of this summer's Olympic Games, the port district is undergoing an urban renewal program. Ticket sales have been slow, and many Brazilians cite the poor state of the economy, which is in recession. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Brazil's Latest Headache: Ticket Sales Lag For Rio Olympics

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