All Things Considered for April 18, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for April 18, 2016

All Things Considered

Author Interviews

'It Takes A Lot Of Bravery To Be Kind,' Says Kids' Author Kate DiCamillo

DiCamillo says Raymie Nightingale, the 10-year-old protagonist at the heart of her latest novel, is a lot like she was as a child: "Very introverted, watching, worrying, wondering, but also hopeful."

Sa'a, a pseudonym she uses for her safety, poses for a photo after an interview with NPR. She was one of more than 250 girls kidnapped in Nigeria by Boko Haram in 2014. Sa'a, 20, escaped by jumping off a moving truck. She began studying at a college in the U.S. in January. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

From Boko Haram Captive To U.S. College Student

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We Move Lightly Dustin O'Halloran
Yellow Bird Pretty Lights

About 14 percent of the Gigafactory in Nevada has been built so far. At 5.8 million square feet, it will be a building with one of the biggest footprints in the world. Tesla hide caption

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Tesla

A Rare Look Inside The 'Gigafactory' Tesla Hopes Will Revolutionize Energy Use

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My Burr Minotaur Shock
Wakin on a Pretty Day Kurt Vile

A Chinese worker checks part of a car at the production line of France's Renault and China's Dongfeng Group factory in February. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

China Killed 1 Million U.S. Jobs, But Don't Blame Trade Deals

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Ferus Gallery Allah-Las

A worker assembles a handgun at the new Beretta plant in Gallatin, Tenn. The Italian gun maker has cited Tennessee's support for gun rights in moving its production from its plant in Maryland. Erik Schelzig/AP hide caption

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Erik Schelzig/AP

Seeking A Warmer Welcome, Gun Factory Moves Down South

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Fin Phontaine
Squirrel of Possibility Punch Brothers
Ballad of Barbara Allen Goldmund
Daydream Youth Lagoon
Germanic Deceptikon
Spectre Tycho
Master of Life Khruangbin
Real Slow Miami Horror
Duraq Andy Nice
Farewell Spaceman Blockhead
Naive Music Ducktails
Go!Amigo TF Boys
Kalimba Mr. Scruff

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