All Things Considered for May 4, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 4, 2016

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Shots - Health News

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

Scientists have been able to keep human embryos alive twice as long as before. The technique is reopening a debate over a rule limiting research on human embryos to 14 days.

Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed

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The apparent Republican nominee, Donald Trump, at Trump Tower in Manhattan on the night of his victory in Indiana. View Press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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View Press/Corbis via Getty Images

Will Donald Trump Get Back The $38 Million He Lent His Campaign?

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Mike Posner Meredith Truax/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Meredith Truax/Courtesy of the artist

With 'Be As You Are,' Mike Posner Finally Takes His Mom's Advice

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

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Empty storefronts line the streets of Northern Cambria, Pa., Jennifer Haigh's hometown. Rob Arnold hide caption

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Rob Arnold

'Heat & Light' Digs For The Soul Of Coal Country

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