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Mimi Sheraton is no fan of kale chips, shown here at Elizabeth's Gone Raw on May 20, 2011 in Washington, D.C. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

The Salt

Kill The Culture Of Cool Kale, Food Critic Says

Mimi Sheraton first praised kale in the 1970s as restaurant critic for The New York Times. Her article might have helped make kale cool today. Now Sheraton says she hates the vegetable.

Silver Plain Thrupence
Peter and Jack El Ten Eleven

Onaje X. O. Woodbine's book, Black Gods of the Asphalt, has also been adapted into a play by the same name. He appears here on that play's set at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass. Brendan C. Hall/Courtesy of DeChant-Hughes & Associates hide caption

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Brendan C. Hall/Courtesy of DeChant-Hughes & Associates

'Black Gods Of The Asphalt' Takes Basketball Beyond The Court

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Yeti's Lament
Quotidian Debris Chequerboard
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One Ahad Jamal

Mimi Sheraton is no fan of kale chips, shown here at Elizabeth's Gone Raw on May 20, 2011 in Washington, D.C. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Kill The Culture Of Cool Kale, Food Critic Says

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Seth Barker of Maine Fresh Sea Farms checks a seaweed line. People have foraged wild seaweed off the Eastern Seaboard for centuries. But now a much more active effort to grow seaweed in the U.S. is afoot. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Seaweed On Your Dinner Plate: The Next Kale Could Be Kelp

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The Process of Leaving E-vax
4:08 Clutchy Hopkins