All Things Considered for July 14, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 14, 2016

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A small memorial marks the former homestead of the Nicely family, who died in the June flooding of White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Shots - Health News

Emotional Healing After A Flood Can Take Just As Long As Rebuilding

Three weeks after the flooding in West Virginia, the phrase "West Virginia Strong" is painted everywhere. But no matter how strong the community, emotional healing after a disaster takes a long time.

The Quicken Loans Arena is decorated to welcome the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Angelo Merendino/Getty Images hide caption

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Angelo Merendino/Getty Images

Some Trump RNC Delegates Surprised About Paying Their Own Way To Cleveland

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Congress has passed a bill that will require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP

Congress Just Passed A GMO Labeling Bill. Nobody's Super Happy About It

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People line up to buy groceries outside a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, on July 13. The State Department issued a travel warning for the country on July 7. Four other countries have been the subject of U.S. travel warnings since July 1. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Often Issues Travel Warnings, But Lately The Tables Are Turned

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In 1964's The Best Man, presidential candidate and principled intellectual William Russell (Henry Fonda) competes with a TV-savvy opportunist at his (unspecified) party's convention. United Artists/The Kobal Collection hide caption

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United Artists/The Kobal Collection

What Do Contested Conventions Look Like? Ask Hollywood And Sinclair Lewis

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Jonathan Choate resigned his post on the Cache County GOP and changed his affiliation to Libertarian after Republicans refused to formally condemn Donald Trump. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Mormons Uneasy With Trump Make A Question Of Reliably Red Utah

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An Egyptian family squeezes onto a motorbike in Cairo in this 2014 photo. After falling for decades, the country's birthrate has been rising in recent years. Egypt now has more than 90 million people, more than twice as many as any other Arab nation. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

Egypt's Population Surges Past 90 Million, Straining Resources Of A Poor Nation

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A small memorial marks the former homestead of the Nicely family, who died in the June flooding of White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Emotional Healing After A Flood Can Take Just As Long As Rebuilding

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