All Things Considered for July 19, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 19, 2016

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A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Shots - Health News

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

The state took Suboxone strips for treatment of opioid abuse off the list of approved drugs for Medicaid. Some patients say the alternatives aren't working for them.

A heat-stressed koala is doused with water in December 2015 during an extreme heat wave in Adelaide, Australia. Last year was the hottest on record, but 2016 is on pace to supplant it at the top of the list. Every month of this year has set heat records. Morne de Klerk/Getty Images hide caption

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Morne de Klerk/Getty Images

Scientists Report The Planet Was Hotter Than Ever In The First Half Of 2016

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People wave Turkish flags Tuesday as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup last Friday. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

Turkey's Post-Coup-Attempt Purge Widens As Arrests And Firings Grow

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A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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A Baltimore police officer shot and wounded a 14-year-old boy in April after spotting him with a Daisy Powerline 340 BB gun, right. A semi-automatic handgun, pictured left, provided by police shows how similar the models look. Juliet Linderman/AP hide caption

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Juliet Linderman/AP

When Police Come Near, BB Guns Look All Too Real

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