All Things Considered for August 2, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for August 2, 2016

All Things Considered

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'The Fire This Time': A New Generation Of Writers On Race In America

Author Jesmyn Ward invited prominent writers from her generation to pen essays for The Fire This Time. It's a nod to James Baldwin's work of a similar name, which warned of today's racial tension.

Things Ain't What They Used to Be Duke Ellington & Ray Brown
Vibe Bignic
Natural Cause Emancipator
Moon RRAREBEAR

Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook traveled from Montana to Dr. Forest Tennant's office in West Covina, Calif. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Montana's 'Pain Refugees' Leave State To Get Prescribed Opioids

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Kiara Bonobo
Safe and Sound Capital Cities
Ventania Bixiga 70
Black Pearl African Music Machine
Some Kinda Mean Joshua Breakstone

The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

What Would Donald Trump's Department Of Justice Look Like?

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Sweat Moss of Aura
Action In Memphis
Shimmer Tracey Chattaway
Recensere Rous
Say My Name ODESZA & Zyra
Dead Sea Scrolls Yeasayer
Division Tycho

Most studies of flossing have been too short to prove the daily practice has long-term health benefits, some dentists say. But conclusive studies aren't cheap or easy. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Does Flossing Help Or Not? The Evidence Is Mixed At Best

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Sophisticated ways of tracking reading habits give publishers hard data that reveals the kinds of books people want to read. But a veteran editor says numbers only go so far in telling the story. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Publishers' Dilemma: Judge A Book By Its Data Or Trust The Editor's Gut?

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Million and One Things to Do Time Machine
Bring Back Pluto Aesop Rock

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