All Things Considered for October 24, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 24, 2016

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World chess champion Magnes Carlsen (right) won't play his computer or play the game like a computer. Instead, he chooses his strategy based on what he knows about his opponent. Sebastian Reuter/Getty Images for World Chess by Agon Limited hide caption

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Sebastian Reuter/Getty Images for World Chess by Agon Limited

All Tech Considered

20 Years Later, Humans Still No Match For Computers On The Chessboard

IBM's Deep Blue beat chess great Garry Kasparov in 1997. Humans and computers play the game differently, but have computers taught humans much about the game?

A boy carries mattresses at a camp for displaced families in Debaga, about 50 miles southeast of Mosul, Iraq, on Monday. Camp residents who recently fled areas controlled by the Islamic State say they expect the extremist group to put up a tough fight in Mosul and surrounding areas. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

Near Mosul, Some Residents Flee ISIS, Others Stay And Fight With ISIS

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Open Your Eyes STRFKR
Sing a Simple Song The Meters

World chess champion Magnes Carlsen (right) won't play his computer or play the game like a computer. Instead, he chooses his strategy based on what he knows about his opponent. Sebastian Reuter/Getty Images for World Chess by Agon Limited hide caption

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Sebastian Reuter/Getty Images for World Chess by Agon Limited

20 Years Later, Humans Still No Match For Computers On The Chessboard

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My Burr Minotaur Shock
Moon RRAREBEAR

Ian Watlington, with the National Disability Rights Network, pauses at the doorway of a Washington, D.C., recreation center used as a polling place. He says the door, which has a stationary bar down the middle, would be too narrow for him to enter if he was in his motorized wheelchair. He can barely get through in his manual chair. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Voters With Disabilities Fight For More Accessible Polling Places

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And Lay Debo Band

Chinese President Xi Jinping (center) holds a welcome ceremony for visiting Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte before their talks in Beijing on Oct. 20. In remarks during his visit, Duterte said, "I announce my separation from the United States. Both in military, not maybe social, but economics also." Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Demanding Greater Respect From U.S., Philippines Looks To China

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Quiet Life Dirty Gold
The Sermon Jimmy McGriff
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Households Sleeping At Last
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Under the Pressure The War On Drugs

You can check HealthCare.gov for health insurance options and prices. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Rates Up 22 Percent For Obamacare Plans, But Subsidies Rise, Too

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Layers Ryan Helsing, Matthew Setz
Coffee Sylvan Esso
Django's Tiger Django Reinhardt
Recensere Rous
Great Escape Washed Out

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