All Things Considered for November 15, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 15, 2016

All Things Considered

A police officer holds a bag of heroin that was confiscated as evidence in Gloucester, Mass., in March. Massachusetts is one of 38 states that allow civil commitment for substance abuse. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

A Twist On 'Involuntary Commitment': Some Heroin Users Request It

Some Massachusetts opioid users are so desperate to quit the drug habit that they are asking judges to lock them up and require treatment. Critics question whether courts should play this role.

He's more likely to get a timeout than a spanking. narvikk/Getty Images hide caption

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narvikk/Getty Images

Spanking Young Children Declines Overall But Persists In Poorer Households

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Chain Reaction Dave Weckl Band
In the Darkest Place Bill Frisell, Burt Bacharach et. al.

Kristen Daniels (left) is considering becoming a Catholic nun. Sister Donna Del Santo faced the same situation when she was 38 and offers some advice for Kristen as she considers entering the discernment process. Courtesy of Kristen Daniels and Sister Donna Del Santo hide caption

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Courtesy of Kristen Daniels and Sister Donna Del Santo

Entering Religious Life Doesn't Mean Leaving The World Behind

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Presence The Carmelite Nun of Luçon
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Spirit of the Zither
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I Read That Letter Sonny Treadway
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Jesus Will Fix It
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Azra Baig won a second term on the school board in South Brunswick, N.J. But many of her reelection signs were defaced with anti-Muslim slurs. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Following Hate Crimes And Trump's Election, Muslims Remain Resilient

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Brother Hunter Djivan Gasparyan
Cleft in the Sky R. Carlos Nakai
A Distant Episode Till Brönner
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Oceana
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Till Brönner

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The broken windows theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime as well. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Getty Images/Image Source

How 'Broken Windows' Helped Shape Tensions Between Police And Communities

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From My Window Keiko Matsui, Vinnie Colaiuta et. al.
Chain Reaction Joe Sample

Megyn Kelly speaks onstage at Tina Brown's 7th Annual Women In The World Summit Opening Night on April 6, in New York City. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images

'My Year Of Guards And Guns': Megyn Kelly On Standing Up To Trump And Ailes

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Stand Tall Be True Kombo & Steve Hall
Frog and Toad The Bad Plus
The Fire Still Burns
Children's Corner 1st Movement Bela Fleck
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Perpetual Motion
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A police officer holds a bag of heroin that was confiscated as evidence in Gloucester, Mass., in March. Massachusetts is one of 38 states that allow civil commitment for substance abuse. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A Twist On 'Involuntary Commitment': Some Heroin Users Request It

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Easy-Don't Hurt Ike Quebec

Both Israel and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as capital. No country maintains an embassy in the city. yeowatzup/Flickr hide caption

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yeowatzup/Flickr

Trump Favors Moving U.S. Embassy To Jerusalem, Despite Backlash Fears

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The Fire Still Burns (For Jimi) Vital Information
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Show 'Em Where You Live
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Vital Information

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Peace Pipe The Shadows
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Shadows Are Go!
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The Shadows

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The new Grand Egyptian Museum, seen here near the pyramids of Giza in June 2015, is due to open late next year. It will display thousands of artifacts, many of them never shown publicly before. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

Fit For A King: Grand Museum Will Showcase Tut And Egypt's Ancient Culture

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Mose Allison, circa 2000. The celebrated pianist and composer died in Hilton Head, S.C. this week. David Redfern/Redferns hide caption

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David Redfern/Redferns

Celebrated Jazz Musician Mose Allison Dies At 89

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Old Man Blues Mose Allison
Bold Ruler's Joys [#] Nathan Salsburg

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