All Things Considered for November 30, 2016 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 30, 2016

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Iraqi children follow instructions given by a teacher (center) during an outdoor class at the Hassan Sham camp on Nov. 10. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Parallels

ISIS Drove Them From School, Now The Kids Of Mosul Want To Go Back

A boy from Mosul, now in an Iraqi camp, quit school after ISIS took it over. "The children were terrified," says his mother. "They should be playing, and instead it was blood, blood everywhere."

Keely Edgington and her daughter, Lula, pose inside their family-owned restaurant, Julep, in Kansas City, Mo. Lula was diagnosed with a neuroblastoma when she was 9 months old. She's now 16 months old. Alex Smith / KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith / KCUR

Worries About Health Insurance Cross Political Boundaries

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Iraqi children follow instructions given by a teacher (center) during an outdoor class at the Hassan Sham camp on Nov. 10. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

ISIS Drove Them From School. Now The Kids Of Mosul Want To Go Back

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Despite assumptions that peanut, egg and other allergies are becoming more common in the U.S., experts say they just don't know. One challenge: Symptoms can be misinterpreted and diagnosis isn't easy. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images

Are Food Allergies On The Rise? Experts Say They Don't Know

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Harold Lopez-Nussa hopes increased exchange between Cuban and American musicians can continue. "I have a lot of hope about this approach," he says. "It will be better for all of us." Eduardo Rawdriguez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Eduardo Rawdriguez/Courtesy of the artist

A Jazz Pianist Considers Fidel Castro's Music Education Legacy

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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday about whether immigrants can be detained indefinitely without a chance to persuade a neutral judge that they are entitled to temporary release. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Supreme Court Tests Whether Detained Immigrants Have Right To Hearing

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Student Cierra Valentine (left) studies with friends and her son Jeremiah on the lawn at Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pa. Ryan Smith/Courtesy of Wilson College hide caption

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Ryan Smith/Courtesy of Wilson College

When The Students On Campus Have Kids Of Their Own

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