All Things Considered for May 21, 2017 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 21, 2017

All Things Considered

Protesters with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), including a costumed tiger, gathered at City Hall in Los Angeles last year to call on the city to prohibit circuses from using tigers, lions and other wild animals in their acts. Circuses have been a target of PETA since it was founded in 1980. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Arts & Life

Ringling Bros. Curtain Call Is Latest Victory For Animal Welfare Activists

After decades of working on animal rights, some activists believe the movement has finally hit the mainstream, in part fueled by social media. It's changing American culture and the economy.

The late Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda, in a portrait taken at her home in California in 2004. J.Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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J.Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images

The Record

By Any Name, Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda Was A Force

6 min

By Any Name, Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda Was A Force

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Protesters with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), including a costumed tiger, gathered at City Hall in Los Angeles last year to call on the city to prohibit circuses from using tigers, lions and other wild animals in their acts. Circuses have been a target of PETA since it was founded in 1980. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Ringling Bros. Curtain Call Is Latest Victory For Animal Welfare Activists

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For three generations, members of the White family have served as police officers in the Indianapolis Police Department. Pictured are Clarence Sr. (from left), Clarence Jr., Rodney Sr., Keith, LeEtta, Rodney Jr., Christopher and Thomas White. Courtesy of the White Family hide caption

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Courtesy of the White Family

Race

How Policing Has Changed For 3 Generations Of Black Police Officers

6 min

How Policing Has Changed For 3 Generations Of Black Police Officers

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All Things Considered