All Things Considered for July 18, 2017 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 18, 2017

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A protester holds up a sign during a July 11 rally calling for accountability regarding alleged collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Politics

'White House Arrest?' Legal Experts Disagree About Prosecuting A President

Special counsel Robert Mueller may be a long way from charging anyone with wrongdoing, let alone the president. But a debate has raged since the country's founding about indicting a sitting president.

Warning Sign Local Natives
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Warning Sign
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Gorilla Manor
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Local Natives

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Dear Mr. Supercomputer Sufjan Stevens
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Dear Mr. Supercomputer
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The Avalanche: Outtakes & Extras from the Illinois Album
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You're So Cold Two Feet
Occlude Nearly Oratorio
How Long Do I Have to Wait For You Sharon Jones

A protester holds up a sign during a July 11 rally calling for accountability regarding alleged collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

'White House Arrest?' Legal Experts Disagree About Prosecuting A President

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Bride San Fermin
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Bride
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Belong
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San Fermin

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British Prime Minister Theresa May marked a year in office last week. After her party lost parliamentary seats in elections last month, doubts have arisen over how long she'll remain prime minister. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

One Year On, Theresa May Keeps Fragile Grip On Her Job As British Prime Minister

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Trap Door Jake One & MF Doom
Divina Toro y Moi

Sen. Jerry Moran speaks during a Senate hearing in June 2017. Moran's opposition has effectively killed the latest Republican healthcare plan. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Loyal Republican Senator From Kansas Who Helped Kill The Health Care Bill

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Cinema Paradiso Ennio Morricone
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Cinema Paradiso
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Cinema Paradiso
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Ennio Morricone

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Pepsi The Mohawks
Paper Tiger Spoon
Family and Genus Shakey Graves
Doubt (Summer Edit) Shallou
We Will Become Silhouettes The Shins

A World Food Programme worker stands next to aid parcels that will be distributed to South Sudanese refugees at the airport in Sudan's North Kordofan state. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Stop The World's Looming Famines

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Inside Out Spoon
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Inside Out
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They Want My Soul
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Spoon

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In 2015, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (center) signs into law an ordinance raising the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. Though California isn't one of them, 27 states have passed laws requiring cities to abide by state minimums. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

As Cities Raise Minimum Wages, Many States Are Rolling Them Back

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The Warning Hot Chip
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The Warning
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Warning
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Hot Chip

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Can You Get To That Funkadelic
Golden Hind Dr. Dog

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