All Things Considered for December 19, 2017 Hear the All Things Considered program for December 19, 2017

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Civil defense workers carrying the body of a civilian retrieved from the rubble of a house destroyed in airstrike. They've collected almost 1,500 bodies so far in west Mosul – many of them women and children – and are still finding casualties. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Parallels

More Civilians Than ISIS Fighters Are Believed Killed In Mosul Battle

A morgue in Mosul, Iraq, documented more than 5,000 civilians killed during the battle to free the city from ISIS — likely more than the number of ISIS fighters that died.

Shoulder Kiss Freddie Joachim
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Crystal Joyce's son — her youngest child — is in his senior year of high school, headed to college in the fall. Joyce (left) gets advice on the transition to being an empty nester from Ana Machado, whose children have all left home. Courtesy of Stephen Joyce and Wilmar Machado hide caption

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Courtesy of Stephen Joyce and Wilmar Machado

Adjusting To An Empty Nest Brings Grief, But Also Freedom

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My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme from "Titanic") [From Titanic] Celine Dion
Finally Moving Pretty Lights

Health workers killed chickens in a Hong Kong market in 2014 in an effort to stop the spread of H7N9 flu. It's being watched closely as a virus that might spark a pandemic outbreak. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

NIH Lifts Ban On Research That Could Make Deadly Viruses Even Worse

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Driving The Wet Pavement Sabzi

Seeking to cut greenhouse gas emissions in California by 40 percent by 2030, state regulators have approved a plan that offers incentives for truck and bus fleets to go green. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

California's New Climate Plan Uses Incentives To Cut Vehicle Emissions

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Lingus Snarky Puppy
Merci Stromae

The Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center is using holograms to help visitors learn about the experiences of people during the Holocaust. Ron Gould Studios/Courtesy of the Illinois Holocaust Museum hide caption

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Ron Gould Studios/Courtesy of the Illinois Holocaust Museum

Illinois Holocaust Museum Preserves Survivors' Stories — As Holograms

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Aminals Baths
Latinos My Neighbour Is

Then-Federal Election Commissioner Matthew Petersen testifies during a hearing before the Elections Subcommittee of House Committee on House Administration on November 3, 2011, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

3 Trump Judicial Nominees Withdraw, Raising Some Questions About Vetting

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Time's Up Linn Mori
Young Hearts Of Summer Dorena

A damaged Amtrak train car is lowered from an overpass Tuesday at the scene of a train crash onto Interstate 5 a day earlier in DuPont, Wash. Federal investigators say they don't yet know why the Amtrak train was traveling 50 mph over the speed limit when it derailed. The rail cars will be taken to a nearby military base for closer analysis. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Derailment Probe Looks At Speed, As Critics Cite Amtrak's 'Lax Safety Culture'

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Ruins Portico Quartet
Witness Dub Roots Manuva

Civil defense workers carrying the body of a civilian retrieved from the rubble of a house destroyed in airstrike. They've collected almost 1,500 bodies so far in west Mosul – many of them women and children – and are still finding casualties. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

More Civilians Than ISIS Fighters Are Believed Killed In Mosul Battle

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Chains Corinne Bailey Rae

Earl Borges, now 70, conducted river patrols in the Navy during the Vietnam War. These days, he says, symptoms from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ALS can intensify the anxiety he experiences as a result of PTSD. Courtesy of Shirley Borges hide caption

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Courtesy of Shirley Borges

Reverberations Of War Complicate Vietnam Veterans' End-Of-Life Care

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Awake Tycho
Seven Minute Mind The Bad Plus

A Hawaii Civil Defense Warning Device, which sounds an alert siren during natural disasters, is shown in Honolulu on Nov. 29, 2017. The alert system is tested monthly, but now Hawaii residents will hear a new tone designed to alert people of an impending nuclear attack by North Korea. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

Nuclear Strike Drills Faded Away In The 1980s. It May Be Time To Dust Them Off

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On My Mind Delavega
Canals Joakim Karud

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