All Things Considered for March 12, 2018 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 12, 2018

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Amina Ahmed at home in Oromo, Ethiopia. Before having cataracts removed from both her eyes, she had been blind for four years. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Goats and Soda

The Miracle Of Cataract Surgery: The Blind Can See Again

Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness globally. But a quick surgery and a $4 plastic lens can restore sight. A group from Vermont is offering free surgery in Africa and Asia.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos stumbles during her interview with Lesley Stahl on CBS's 60 Minutes. 60 Minutes/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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60 Minutes/Screenshot by NPR

A Rocky Appearance For DeVos On '60 Minutes'

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Professor Eric van Oort uses this 'virtual oil rig' to do research at the University of Texas at Austin. He helps advise companies on how to improve operations. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

America's Oil Boom Is Fueled By A Tech Boom

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Police vehicles line up at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting that killed 17 people last month. Officers were frustrated when the Broward County radio dispatch system seemed to be jammed. Gaston De Cardenas /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas /AFP/Getty Images

Years After Sept. 11, Critical Incidents Still Overload Emergency Radios

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Amina Ahmed at home in Oromo, Ethiopia. Before having cataracts removed from both her eyes, she had been blind for four years. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

A 4-Minute Surgery That Can Give Sight To The Blind

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Jeanne and Gideon Bernstein, parents of Blaze Bernstein (pictured behind them), speak at a news conference in Lake Forest, Calif., in January. Former classmate Sam Woodward, an alleged neo-Nazi, has been charged with fatally stabbing Bernstein. Amy Taxin/AP hide caption

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Amy Taxin/AP

Deadly Connection: Neo-Nazi Group Linked To 3 Accused Killers

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Pope Francis waves to the crowd in St. Peter's Square on Sunday. Recent months have seen Francis become the target of criticism on various fronts, and his image as a charismatic reformer has suffered some hits. Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

After 5 Years As Pope, Francis' Charismatic Image Has Taken Some Hits

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The Navy's new USS Little Rock arrives at the harbor in Buffalo, N.Y., last December. In imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, President Trump said the U.S. military should be as self-sufficient as possible. Carolyn Thompson/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Thompson/AP

Trump Says Tariffs Are Needed To Protect Vital Industries, But Are They?

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An MIT study tracked 126,000 stories and found that false ones were 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than ones that were true. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Can You Believe It? On Twitter, False Stories Are Shared More Widely Than True Ones

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