All Things Considered for May 21, 2018 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 21, 2018

All Things Considered

Florida's coral reefs, already bleached by years of warming ocean waters, are being further battered by a mysterious disease. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hide caption

toggle caption
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Environment And Energy Collaborative

Battered By Bleaching, Florida's Coral Reefs Now Face Mysterious Disease

Florida's coral reefs are being decimated by a mysterious disease. It comes after years of warming waters have bleached coral reefs around the world, leaving them weakened.

Thanx Dub [#] Sublime
Bird's Lament Moondog & London Saxophonic

A 360-degree camera is used to document the Khe Min Ga Zedi temple in Bagan, Myanmar. Kieran Kesner for CyArk hide caption

toggle caption
Kieran Kesner for CyArk

3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609084578/613117655" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
My Blue Heaven Benny Carter
Titi Dem Too Service The Kondi Band
Open Up Eric Lau

Florida's coral reefs, already bleached by years of warming ocean waters, are being further battered by a mysterious disease. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hide caption

toggle caption
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Battered By Bleaching, Florida's Coral Reefs Now Face Mysterious Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611258056/613117661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Get It Right Tidus
Sinnerman Nina Simone
The Dig Groundislava
Over and Over Hot Chip

People watch a TV showing images of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (right), South Korean President Moon Jae-in and U.S. President Donald Trump — and the words "Thawing Korean Peninsula" — at a railway station in Seoul, South Korea on March 7. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

As Trump-Kim Summit Approaches, South Korea's Leader Heads To White House

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612965580/613117667" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Come On DJ Jazzy Jeff & Dave Ghetto
La Californie Souleance
Franklin Avenue Brad Mehldau
Time Sudan Archives

People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court last month. The court sided with businesses on not allowing class-action lawsuits for federal labor violations. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Decision Delivers Blow To Workers' Rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/605012795/613117679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Times They Are A-Changin' Joshua Redman
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
Times They Are A-Changin'
Album
Timeless Tales (For Changing Times)
Artist
Joshua Redman

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

People walk through a flooded street in in Miami Beach, Fla., in 2015. The city is eyeing $500 million in infrastructure upgrades, installing 80 new pumps over a decade to redirect floodwaters back to the ocean. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Foreign Investors Shrug Off Miami's Rising Sea Levels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611919853/613117685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ascension Sufyvn
Freedom

Saxophonist Coleman Hawkins and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie in concert with the Cannonball Adderley Quintet in November 1960. Express/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Express/Getty Images

What Makes A Jazz Standard?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613091545/613117691" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Birdland Weather Report
Brunch at the Bodega Flamingoisis

All Things Considered