All Things Considered for September 5, 2018 Hear the All Things Considered program for September 5, 2018

All Things Considered

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Education

From Poverty To Rocket Scientist To CEO, A Girl Scout's Inspiring Story

When she was a Brownie, Sylvia Acevedo was inspired to earn her science badge. In her new memoir, the Girl Scouts CEO says this experience led directly to her career at NASA.

Instrumental The Microphones
Ah Ouia Exile

Reporter April Ryan raises her hand during a press briefing at the White House in 2017. Her pointed questioning has often earned her the ire of the Trump administration's communications team, as she writes in Under Fire. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In The Trump Era, Journalist April Ryan Finds Herself 'Under Fire'

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Waves [Chilly Gonzales Piano Remake] [Remix] Erol Alkan & Boys Noize
Windowpane The Mild High Club

Blackwater security contractors guard Zalmay Khalilzad, then the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, as he arrives at a community sports center in Baghdad in 2006. Jacob Silberberg/AP hide caption

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Jacob Silberberg/AP

Zalmay Khalilzad Appointed As U.S. Special Adviser To Afghanistan

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A 2-millimeter hole was found last week in a Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft (left) that is docked to the International Space Station. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP

Who Caused The Mysterious Leak At The International Space Station?

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"I try to have a little more empathy for myself and try to encourage these things that I'm naturally thinking and feeling, rather than thinking, 'That's too weird if I do that,'" Aaron Lee Tasjan says. Curtis Wayne Millard/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Curtis Wayne Millard/Courtesy of the artist

Aaron Lee Tasjan Employs 'A Little More Empathy' And A Lot More Freedom In New Music

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All Things Considered