All Things Considered for October 15, 2018 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 15, 2018

All Things Considered

Illinois Department of Corrections officers participate in a role-playing exercise during a March training session on working with female inmates, at Logan Correctional Center in Lincoln, Ill. Bill Healy for SJNN hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Healy for SJNN

Investigations

In Prison, Discipline Comes Down Hardest On Women

Data from 15 states reveal that female inmates are disciplined at higher rates than men for smaller infractions of prison rules — often with harsh consequences.

Tengo un Trato [Instrumental] Mala Rodríguez
3WW Alt-J
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
3WW
Album
Relaxer
Artist
Alt-J

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., released a DNA analysis to clarify questions about her Native American heritage, something President Trump commonly mocks. Warren is considering a 2020 presidential bid. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Warren Releases DNA Results, Challenges Trump Over Native American Ancestry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657468655/657588636" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
All In Here Emancipator
For Love I Come Thundercat

James Wolfe, former director of security with the Senate intelligence committee, reached a plea agreement with prosecutors after he was charged with three counts of lying to investigators. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Ex-Senate Intelligence Staffer Who Dated Reporter Pleads Guilty To Lying To FBI

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657551289/657624252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ammar Campa-Najjar, who is running against Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter, speaks to reporters outside the San Diego Federal Courthouse during Hunter's arraignment hearing in August. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter, Under Indictment, Launches False Attacks On Opponent

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656879294/657588642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Coffee Cold Galt MacDermot

Jeff Van Horn, a land surveyor for the oil and gas industry, worries that Colorado's Proposition 112 would hurt industry growth. It seeks to dramatically increase the distance between wells and homes to 2,500 feet. Grace Hood/CPR hide caption

toggle caption
Grace Hood/CPR

Colorado's Anti-Fracking Measure Would Keep Wells Farther Away From Homes And Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656922702/657588648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Roll The Bones (Unlucky Skin) Shakey Graves
Lights Vitamin String Quartet

According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

toggle caption
alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657493767/657588654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Break Hard Proof
Bad Luck Blues Blend Crafters
Pelleus Pavane
So so Lovely Shigeto

Illinois Department of Corrections officers participate in a role-playing exercise during a March training session on working with female inmates, at Logan Correctional Center in Lincoln, Ill. Bill Healy for SJNN hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Healy for SJNN

In Prison, Discipline Comes Down Hardest On Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/647874342/657588660" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Moonchild Flako
Cler Achel Tinariwen
Bounce: pts I + II Nate Smith

At a recent meeting of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, angry taxi drivers who want the city to buy back their medallions, surrounded Kate Toran, who heads the city's taxi program. Sam Harnett/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Harnett/KQED

Cities Made Millions Selling Taxi Medallions, Now Drivers Are Paying the Price

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656595597/657588666" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Chardonnay Dexter
Busy Nomo
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
Busy
Album
Nomo
Artist
Nomo

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Think [Instrumental] [Instrumental] Curtis Mayfield
I Travel To You Cafe Buddha Beats

All Things Considered